How to Make Small Talk in German

How to Make Small Talk in German

Germans don’t do small talk. (Well, sometimes they do – but they rarely admit it.) Most German-speakers will tell you that their language is too serious and precise to be wasted on small talk or chitchat, especially with strangers. Anyone who has lived in Berlin for any length of time knows that Berliners in particular aren’t prone to idle chatter – even if they know you fairly well.
Making small talk in German Language is just the same as in English. Small talk describes the brief conversations that you have with people you don’t know well. Small talk is where friendships are made. If you know how to make small talk in German you’ll be able to “break the ice” and get to know some of the people you meet during your trip.
Small talk generally consists of greetings and introductions and descriptions of personal information and interests. If you are able to hold your own in each of these areas, you’ll be able to handle most small talk situations.
Greetings and introductions
Although German people are often more formal than folks in the United States, you usually don’t need to wait around to be introduced to someone. Take the initiative to walk up to someone and say hello.
The most common ways to greet someone is to simply say hello (Hallo or Guten Tag). If you’re in Southern Germany, the most common hello is Grüß Gott. Next, just introduce yourself and ask the other person their name. The following phrases are all you need to get a conversation started.
•  Ich heiße . . . (My name is . . .)
•  Wie heißen Sie? (What’s your name? [Formal])
•  Kann ich meine Frau, Fabienne einführen? (May I introduce my wife, Fabienne?).
Greetings and introductions are usually accompanied by a Wie geht es Ihnen? (How are you? [Formal]) There are many possible responses, but the most common would be to say Gut, danke. (I’m fine, thank you.) or Nicht schlecht. (Not bad.)
Personal information
After the necessary introductions, small talk is really just a question of sharing information about yourself and asking the other person questions. The following phrases will come in handy when you’re chitchatting with someone new.
•  Ich komme aus . . . (I am from . . .)
•  Ich komme aus Österreich. (I’m from Austria.)
•  Woher kommen Sie? (Where are you from?)
•  Was bist du von Beruf? (What is your profession?)
•  Wie alt bist du? (How old are you?)
•  Wo wohnst du? (Where do you live?)
•  Ich bin Student /Studentin. [M/F] (I’m a student.)
•  Ich bin Lehrerin [F] (I’m a teacher.)
Personal interests
Many friendships are forged on the bond of common interests. You can use the following phrases to compare interests when making small talk In German Language
•  Was machen Sie in Ihrer Freizeit? [Formal] (What do you do for fun?)
•  Ich spiele Golf. (I play golf.)
•  Ich spiele Fußball. (I play soccer.)
•  Ich spiele Tennis. (I play tennis.)
•  Ich sammle Briefmarken. (I collect stamps.)
•  Ich wandere gern. (I like hiking.)
     

1) German (Deutsch)

 
German language, this is the easiest language for native English speakers. German is the most widely spoken in Germany. German language is an important language in the history of religion and philosophy as well as science and technology. It is second most popular foreign language in India. The five main reasons:-
 
1.      i)Most spoken native language in Europe. It is official language in Germany, Austria, Switzerland, and many more countries. 
ii) Germany is one of the Technology Giant and people from all over the world travel to German for various purpose and ability to speak German offers plenty of  Career opportunities in many big German companies like Volkswagen, Mercedes Benz, Audi, BASF, Daimler, Bosch, Siemens  BMW and Ford have survived and made their market based strong in last few years, German is a most preferable choice in the field of Science, Engineering, Automobile, etc.
iii) The German language is part of academic curriculum in more than 500 Schools and Colleges in India including more than 250 Central Govt. Schools (Kendriya Vidyalayas) alone. 
iv) Germany is an economic powerhouse And It’s a “First Move advantage” – Like French, German government initiated to promote German in India several decades back. In 1957, “Max Mueller Bhavan” was first inaugurated in Kolkata. In fact, The first German lessons in India were imparted in Pune and Mumbai in 1914.
v)  Germany’s universities have an excellent international reputation and among with the best in Career opportunities the world.  Their wide array of scholarship, Proficiency in German language plays an important role if you’re planning to go Germany, Switzerland or Austria for higher studies.
 
German language is almost similar to English Language, because English and German share 60% of their vocabulary and some Part of Grammer. English Language has 26 Letters and German Language has in all 30 Letters. German and English language shared lots of common Vocabulary like January in English and Januar in German. Even 80 of the 100 most common words in English are Germanic in origin. Most frequently words in German Language and English Language are from the same roots.
The words with the most of similarities are often simple, functional words like:  my, the, be, which and would which are used for almost 50%-55% of all spoken English. In part of pronunciations, listening German and English are often incredibly similar. There are more examples of this type of similarities between German and English. These similarities help you to learn German in easy way. German is easy language for learning compare to other foreign languages.
Some of the Common Examples are –
 
Months in English  
 
Months in English  Months in German
JanuaryJanuar
FebruaryFebruar
MarchMärz
AprilApril
MayMai
JuneJuni
JulyJuli
AugustAugust
SeptemberSeptember
OctoberOktober
NovemberNovember
DecemberDezember
 

2) French (Français)

French is a popular foreign language to learn in India. Since French is the part of most School and College curriculum in india and other countries in Asia, More than 1 lakh students studying French in Delhi / NCR only. Add other Indian cities, the number will be staggering high. 
French is also one of the best foreign language to learn for jobs in corporate sectors in India. Many multinational companies use French as their working language in a wide range of sectors (fashion, education, banking and finance, export and import, travelling, retailing, education, automotive, luxury goods, aeronautics, etc).
Most spoken native language in Europe. It is official language in Europe, Africa, Americas, Asia and more
Learning French language in India and other countries in Asia  can be a career asset in several sectors.

10 Job Opportunities For German Language Learners

1. German language teacher/trainer
It is the first  career opportunity that comes to mind. After completing your German classes, you can be certified as a German language expert. If you have a flair for teaching. Then you can try as a German teacher in School, Lecturer in Colleges and Universities, Corporate trainer in various enterprises, Online teaching classes, and German faculty in any Institute. Some language institutes and colleges in India are actively looking for experts in German.
The good thing is that a large proportion of the people that learn the language do so for other career reasons.  Again, you can decide to become your boss by organizing a private German language training class/session for interested candidates or just become a freelancer in teaching from one place to another
2. Translator & Interpreter
One of the most attractive career opportunities you can secure as a German language learner is in the translation and interpretation sector of the economy. Some government organizations in India, MNCs, and NGOs need translators—someone who can translate a source language into a clear and precise target language.
The similar function applies to an interpreter. If you are proficient in your translation and interpretation skills, translation service providers across the world will be eager to snap you up once they see your CV. Acting as an interpreter can be very lucrative career options, depending on how experienced and fluent you are. You can also work as a German translator & interpreter for global organizations and translation bureaus like the UNO or FAO.
3. Engineering Jobs in India and Germany
Germans are world leaders in engineering. Currently, there is an acute shortage of qualified engineers in the German job market. As per the recent survey, more than 50% of German companies fear that they will not find enough engineers in the future. Proficiency in German increases your job opportunities with German and foreign companies in India, Germany, and other countries.
4. Tourism Industry
Do you know that the tourism sector in India contributes about 6.88 percent to the country’s total GDP as of 2017? It is noteworthy that during this period, a large number of tourists that visit India come from Germany and other German-speaking countries. With roughly 10% of all global travel, Germans are the most widespread travelers. You can work as a tour guide for German-speaking tourists, especially if you are the type that loves the outdoors.
5. Hospitality industry
Apart from working as a tour guide, you can also benefit from working in one of the many hospitality management centers. Here, you can work as an executive in the guest’s relations department of travel companies, large hotels, event centers, and more. The sector is always in search of the best minds.
6. Aeroflight sector
In the accelerated growth in international air travel, multilingualism and multiculturalism mean business. Ability to speak English fluently and proficiency in at least one foreign language like German are often mandatory to reach even the interview stage of the recruitment procedure for ground crew and aviation staff.
7. Research analyst
Science and technology is a significant force that drives modern human economic endeavors today. And it happens that Germany is one of the three most significant contributors to global scientific research. It makes the German language the second most widely utilized scientific language. Your ability to speak and read in German can get you a job as an assistant analyst in research facilities owned and operated by the government or private bodies in India, Germany, or such other German-speaking countries.
8. Media industry
The writer never goes out of style. The content writers have always been in demand from small companies to a giant corporation. However, with the escalating growth of modern technology and the internet, the need for excellent writers have increased manifold. A job in this area is even more possible considering that the German language is one of the most used tongues on the internet.
The modern world is driven by information, and that includes print and e-sources of information. Hundreds of media houses in India and thousands of online websites and publishing houses are always in need of content writers and publishers. You can apply for such openings in need of a German-language expert. You can work as a proof-reader, editor, ghostwriter, and more.
9. Journalism
The journalism industry is one of the largest employers of people with language skills. The journalism sector is one that is never scarce of job opportunities for foreign language experts, and that includes German speakers. You can be in India working as a foreign correspondent for a TV broadcasting company located in Austria. If you want to help others tell their stories, this one career opportunity comes to mind.
10. Public relations
ITES, outsourcing, and offshoring industry have brought tons of employment opportunities in India, paving the way for learning German languages in India. Apart from MNCs in the BPO and KPO sectors, many public relations agencies in India and abroad need the services of a foreign language expert.
In other words, you can apply to work as a representative with any of such public relations agencies. The majority also work on behalf of famous companies in the KPO and BPO sectors dealing with their German-speaking counterparts.

How to Make Small Talk in German

Germans don’t do small talk. (Well, sometimes they do – but they rarely admit it.) Most German-speakers will tell you that their language is too serious and precise to be wasted on small talk or chitchat, especially with strangers. Anyone who has lived in Berlin for any length of time knows that Berliners in particular aren’t prone to idle chatter – even if they know you fairly well.
Making small talk in German Language is just the same as in English. Small talk describes the brief conversations that you have with people you don’t know well. Small talk is where friendships are made. If you know how to make small talk in German you’ll be able to “break the ice” and get to know some of the people you meet during your trip.
Small talk generally consists of greetings and introductions and descriptions of personal information and interests. If you are able to hold your own in each of these areas, you’ll be able to handle most small talk situations.
Greetings and introductions
Although German people are often more formal than folks in the United States, you usually don’t need to wait around to be introduced to someone. Take the initiative to walk up to someone and say hello.
The most common ways to greet someone is to simply say hello (Hallo or Guten Tag). If you’re in Southern Germany, the most common hello is Grüß Gott. Next, just introduce yourself and ask the other person their name. The following phrases are all you need to get a conversation started.
•  Ich heiße . . . (My name is . . .)
•  Wie heißen Sie? (What’s your name? [Formal])
•  Kann ich meine Frau, Fabienne einführen? (May I introduce my wife, Fabienne?).
Greetings and introductions are usually accompanied by a Wie geht es Ihnen? (How are you? [Formal]) There are many possible responses, but the most common would be to say Gut, danke. (I’m fine, thank you.) or Nicht schlecht. (Not bad.)
Personal information
After the necessary introductions, small talk is really just a question of sharing information about yourself and asking the other person questions. The following phrases will come in handy when you’re chitchatting with someone new.
•  Ich komme aus . . . (I am from . . .)
•  Ich komme aus Österreich. (I’m from Austria.)
•  Woher kommen Sie? (Where are you from?)
•  Was bist du von Beruf? (What is your profession?)
•  Wie alt bist du? (How old are you?)
•  Wo wohnst du? (Where do you live?)
•  Ich bin Student /Studentin. [M/F] (I’m a student.)
•  Ich bin Lehrerin [F] (I’m a teacher.)
Personal interests
Many friendships are forged on the bond of common interests. You can use the following phrases to compare interests when making small talk In German Language
•  Was machen Sie in Ihrer Freizeit? [Formal] (What do you do for fun?)
•  Ich spiele Golf. (I play golf.)
•  Ich spiele Fußball. (I play soccer.)
•  Ich spiele Tennis. (I play tennis.)
•  Ich sammle Briefmarken. (I collect stamps.)
•  Ich wandere gern. (I like hiking.)

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